DO YOU KNOW THE STORY BEHIND VLISCO FABRICS YOU WEAR? FIND OUT NOW



Vlisco Fabrics often have a meaning attached to them. Some of them represent very personal stories, some stories are picked up from the market and other stories are attached to a special occasion. 

Leaf Trail

  Story by vlisco book
This pattern is an imitation batik in which the typical incorporation of stripes and dots is clearly visible in the motif, symbolising the batik origins of today’s wax prints.
The name ‘Empty barrels make the most noise’ means that if you are good in something you must be modest about it. Others may say you’re good but you must never say so yourself. The same name also refers to the fact that this pattern sold poorly at first, but after a number of years it became the most popular pattern. As for its enormous popularity, in Benin its name means, ‘my dressmaker cannot buy my fabric because it is rare and difficult to obtain’.
Sometimes one colourway of a pattern acquires a special meaning. In Ghana, for example, the version of this pattern with blue for the main motifs is only worn by women who want to indicate they are pregnant.
Also known as: Zamba-zamba, Agre Pankasssa, Ahuodi Pankassa
This fabric is called Makaïva in Togo en benin
This fabric is called Feuille-feuille in Ivory Coast.


Air Afrique
 Story by vlisco book
This pattern has many different meanings.
Swallows are a symbol of good luck. But the pattern also symbolises asking for a favour, such as the hand of a young woman.
In Benin the pattern signifies asking for permission to have an audience with the king, while in Togo the pattern is called ‘Air Afrique’ because the fabric was also used in the uniform of the local airline company.
In the Ebo land it is called 'Eneke', it is said that if the hunters learn to shoot without missing it has also learn to fly without perching. (via Peter Zonyrah on http://Facebook.com/vliscofashion)
And in Ghana the pattern refers to the transience of riches: rich today, poor tomorrow, for money has wings and can fly away.
Also known as: Sagbadrè, Hirondelles, Speedbird, Ago le fio home (Benin)

 Roi du Zaire


Story by valene lontanga
My mom told me this nice story about what she thinks about when she sees this pattern. I felt like a little child listening to a Disney story.. This fabric directly caught my moms eye, not just because she also has this one, but because of the fact that Mobutu ''king of Zaire', worn it as a blazer during a speech to the country. The time of Mobutu as president reminds my mom of a great time in Congo, eventho there was a lot of trouble too. She said, oh when i see this fabric i see our proud king of Zaire and talked about many things he did. Oke, i wasn't there when mobutu reigned but now i don't see this fabric only as just one of the first super wax patterns in Congo anymore, i see the story of Mobutu..


Six Bougies
 Story by vlisco book
In May 1940, a Portuguese trader named Nogueira arrived in Helmond in the Netherlands to order a custom-made Wax Block. He conceived an idea for a design with six spark plugs (bougies), indicating that its wearer had a six-cylinder car, a sign of wealth.
During the Second World War, Vlisco was unable to carry out production operations, but numerous trial productions with ‘Six Bougies’ were conducted. After the war, this supply of fabric constituted the first shipment to the fully dried-up Congolese market, and it appears to have been an immediate success.
But the design also took on a different popular meaning: the woman in the middle is strong enough to take on six men.

Mandela

 Story by vlisco book
This Java pattern was launched because of Mandela’s immense popularity following his release from prison in 1990 and his leading role afterwards in the negotiations for multi-racial democracy. The framework of the design, however, was designed in 1989 to suit different portraits, from Charles de Gaulle to Pope John Paul II.
This design is no longer popular in Nigeria because Mandela’s ex-wife Winny has Nigerian roots and Nigerians do not accept the divorce. This explains why this design was taken off the market.

Java is characterised by special colour effects in the printed areas: colour gradients. Patterns with this effect are called Maxi Prints.

Hibiscus

 Story by vlisco book
The halftone printing technique that is used in this pattern can only be used with Wax Blocks. The wax is applied to both sides of the fabric. By applying the wax partially to only one side of the fabric, the dye does not penetrate thoroughly. This results in a special transparent effect, especially in the ‘Hibiscus’ pattern. The transparency is visible in the veins of the design. The version with yellow and red motifs against the white background enjoys a particularly exalted status for African consumers in Guinea and Ivory Coast. Twelve yards of this fabric are a must in every dowry. ‘No Hibiscus, no wedding’!

Also known as: Hisbisque, Florba

Kofi Annan’s Brains

Story by vlisco book
Some patterns cannot be produced in all the available colours because of their fine design. In this pattern, for example, the foundation consists entirely of hachures, a network of fine lines. In production it was discovered that non-indigo foundation colours were especially likely to result in unwanted irregular spots. So this pattern became one of the first in which customers were not given the option to choose from the entire colour palette. The pattern is so named because on the day it was launched the gentleman in question was giving a speech at the United Nations in New York.

This pattern is popular in Ghana.

Sarong from Coromandel

 Story by vlisco book
This sarong comes from Coromandel, India. It was made by means of a tjanting: a wooden tool with a metal cup and tiny spout out of which the wax seeps.
While its date is unknown, it is certain to have been produced before 1905. The batik was kept in the former ‘Exo (exotic fabrics) drawing room’, where it served as a source of inspiration. Vlisco’s design department gave it to the Pieter Fentener van Vlissingen Museum when it was founded in 1960. Since then it has been the property of what is now the Pieter Fentener van Vlissingen Foundation.

Autumn Leaf Congo Leaf

 Story by vlisco book
'Autumn Leaf’ is one of the biggest Javanese successes. The pattern was specially developed with specific colours. Interestingly, in Ghana the pattern is called ‘Congo Leaf’. It is not unusual for West African countries to be aware of each other’s specific design characteristics in colour and ornamentation. ‘Autumn Leaf’ comes in a variety of colour combinations, each one popular in a different country.

The pattern was originally designed for Cameroon, when patterns were still intended exclusively for a particular country or market.

La Famille


Story by vlisco book
Vlisco’s best-selling Wax Block pattern. The ‘Happy Family’ design represents the archetypical African family. It is synonymous with the social identity of its wearer. At the centre is the maternal figure, the chicken, surrounded by her chicks and future chicks, i.e. the eggs. The father, i.e. the rooster, is nothing but trouble. That is why only his head is shown. This clearly indicates that the woman plays a pivotal role in the family. ‘Happy Family’ stands for family values from which the wearer derives status.

WIN OF OF THESE LOVELY FABRICS AND TICKET TO ATTEND VLISCO BE YOUR DREAM AWARD 2013 CLICK HERE
DO YOU KNOW THE STORY BEHIND VLISCO FABRICS YOU WEAR? FIND OUT NOW DO YOU KNOW THE STORY BEHIND VLISCO FABRICS YOU WEAR? FIND OUT NOW Reviewed by Editor Post on 06:13:00 Rating: 5

Ad Home

Enter your email address to be the first to hear about our latest info about fashion:

Delivered by Fashionmania Gh

Powered by Blogger.